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in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
. a major earthquake strikes japan... killing hundreds.. and triigering tsunami pacific and u-s. we have just learned that tsunami waves are hitting hawaii... being evacuated.some counties in washington state and oregon are also being evacuated. evacuated.here's a look at what started it all... the 8-point-9 magnitude qqake sent people fleeing into streets... and fell into waters unnerneaah.up to three-hundred bodies have been found in japan.. and hundreds of others areestill missing.the entire west coast of the u-s is under a tsunami warning. will they or won't they?that's the question when it comes to the looming n-f-l lockout.. after a week extension..the deadline is today.the n-f-l players union and team owners are at crossroads when it comes to money.if no progress is made, look for the owners to lock out the players. we are now just one day away from our be-more healthy expo. all day tomorrow ... you can come out to the convention center downtown to take a step towards a new more active lifes. lifestyle. candace dold is live in our studio with a preview. ad lib. 33 coming up..
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy when the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said its stored fuel rods were totally exposed. units 5 and 6, which are also out of service, may also have problems with their used fuel rods. experts say unit 3 is especially dangerous, because it has recycled fuel that contains plutonium, an even greater health threat than the uranium in the oar reactors. the first of that electricity, brian, will go to unit 2. un
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
is -- u.s. red cross is extending their hand. if the american people would like to help us please get in touch with those red cross and ngos and we are very gratified for that. >> thank you so much, mr. ambassador. we wish you luck in the days ahead. up next, a nuclear power expert gives us his take on fears of a partial meltdown in japan. ♪ punching that clock from dusk till dawn ♪ ♪ countin' the days till friday night ♪ ♪ that's when all the conditions are right for a good time ♪ [ male announcer ] advanced technology that helps provide cleaner air, cleaner water, and helps make all of us more energy efficient is something the whole world can get in step with. [ static ] ♪ i need a good time [ male announcer ] ecomagination from ge. it's technology that makes the world work. ♪ should i bundle all my policies with nationwide insurance ? watch this. on one hand, you have your home insurance with one company. and on another hand, you have your auto with another. and on another hand, you have your life with another. huh... but when you bundle them all together with natio
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a l
>>> breaking news this thursday morning. >> getting out. overnight, the u.s. government announces plans to airlift americans from danger. >> it's because of the critical situation at the devastated nuclear plant. workers on a race against time before radiation spreads. but one expert tells abc news, it's almost too late. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
of condolences today in washington calling for a safety review of all u.s. nuclear plants and offered assurances that harmful levels would not reach the west coast. >> now, state health officials are trying to reassure us tonight that the west coast does not face a serious threat from japan. this one is in san francisco. and uc berkeley scientists put up one on top of the engineering building. california's director of public health says reports are not true. >> there are winds shift sog some will be blowing west. almost all will get washed out by storms that are there and dissipate. >> dr. backer says there may be a slight increase in radiation over next few day buzz amount will be no greater than what we're exposed to on a daily basis. >> many people continue to have concerns about dangerous radiation reaching our shores. rain freedman has been following this story and not everyone believes what they hear from the government. >> that is true. it's more of mistrust. and there are a lot of people still buying radiation dedoctors on ebay, and are buying pills in stores. and there are people saying
libya. what it could mean for u.s. military. computer hackers targeting celeb's private e-mail files and compromising pictures. now a federal investigation is under way. >>> let's start with moammar gadhafi changing course in response to the u.n. security council vote to impose a no-fly zone over libya and use all necessary measures to protect civilians. a no-fly zone could bring the u.s. military into libya with air strikes. some people are questioning, does this mean a third military engagement for an already-pressed u.s. military? gadhafi has imposed a cease-fire halting all military operations. this is a complete 180 for the leader who promised fierce attacks if libya was bombed. "the new york times" says four of its journalists who were reported missing in libya have been found. "the times" said all four were captured by forces loyal to gadhafi and will be released. we'll keep you posted on developments in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small part
tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen. >> -- sent over to support them in their efforts has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people, which were added to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've actually taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions, mounted them, one on a fixed wing aircraft, one on a helicopter. and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we have been collecting information as they've come back when t
for about 20 countries and includes the west coast of the u.s., hawaii, as well, alaska, as well. >> yeah, i understand, rob, we've been hearing there's a full coastal evacuation in effect in hawaii right now. and we get this sheet and i know you have it too of the coordinates and the estimated arrival time. what does that translate into in terms of waves and what people can expect? and really how much time they have to get out of harm's way? >> well, the pictures that we've been showing, those dramatic pictures where you see water and debris on all sorts of stuff moving rapidly inland, being pushed in like that and tens of miles inland, there was little warning. this is very close to the shoreline, and the epicenter was about 80 miles offshore. so the wave -- the tsunami after the quake happened hit that shoreline about 15 to 20 minutes later. virtually no warning at all. and you get the full force of that impact without any sort of buffer from the ocean. now, as this thing travels across the ocean in all directions down to the south up to the north off to the east, it does begin to lose it
%. bill: the mounting nuclear concerns forcing the u.s. military to reposition some ships and aircraft away from the east coast of japan. the u.s.s. ronald reagan now pulling back from the fukushima plant after low levels of radioactivity were found in the air. 17 air crew members who returned from a relief mission were said to have been exposed to low levels of radioactive activity. they were treated but they have not had any reaction. >> reporter: following the disaster in japan some say it's still a viable and vital source of energy in the u.s., but connecticut senator joe lieberman says it's time to put a brake on nuclear power. >> put the brakes on it until we understand the ramifications of what's happened in japan. we have 104 nuclear power plants in america now. 23 of them are built according to designs that are similar to the nuclear power plants in japan that are now the focus of our concern. >> reporter: senator lieberman says he still supports the development of nuclear power, but the u.s. should take another look at its domestic policy. bill: the facts on the fukushima nuc
holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grade school. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: in 1968, as whaling continued worldwide, the first recordings of humpback songs were relqb:qb. ( whale singing ) public reaction mud to international bans. whale populations began to recover. at pacific life, the whale symbolizes what is possible if people stop and think about the future. help protect your future with pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. ♪ ♪çç moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates founda
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
tomorrow on what happened in japan and lessons learned for the u.s., what do you think you're going to s learnsome. >> guest: we're going to have a meeting tomorrow with the full commission at the nrc to get an update on the current status onm the situation in japan. we'll probably have a brief discussion then about what kind of impact radiation can have for the public, and then we'll take a look at some things, kind ofei plan for a plan for how we intend to go forward to do our review and look at what, what kinds of thing we may need tod look at for the u.s. nuclear reactors. >> host: and with the fukushima plant in particular, we're told this morning that two of the six reactors are now under control, but japanese officialsix indicating this facility eventually will have to be shut down. >> guest: welling right nowwill we're continuing to -- well, right now we're continuing to monitor the situation. we have a team of 11 nrc experts who are in tokyo, and they're working with their counterparts there to get information. right now our focus continues to be to insure cooling for three of t
. the warnings have been issued for at least 20 countries including the u.s. west coast. >>> good morning i am sherrie johnson. we have team coverage and live reports from around the u.s. and the world this morning. we kick things off with abc's emily schmidt live in washington with how white house officials are responding. >> reporter: the earthquake lasted second but the catastrophe continues to spread. there are tsunami warnings stretching across the a sick and waves are hitting hawaii right now. largest quake in japan's history shook a nation. and triggered tsunami waves that threatened the u.s. west coast. forcing evacuations in hawaii. >> it's time for a little aloha and a little you keep it simple and sensible and moving. >> reporter: cameras capture the moment the earthquake hit in japan. for lawmakers gathered for government, the newsroom shaken up by the 8.9 magnitude earthquake. the quake set off huge fires including this oil refinery north of tokyo. workers evacuated high rises and filled the streets. millions are without power after the deadly quake. one woman said i thought i was
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
and the possibility of the u.s. nations conducted air strikes against libyan forces which are just out side of that gauzy right now. let us go to the newsroom. >> reporter: good point, there are four journalists that will be released today. the for a journalist before reported missing while they were covering the libyan conflict. there will be released later on this afternoon. i will keep monitoring the wires into be posted throughout the morning. back to. >> thank-you, the time ballot is 602. that is talk about the weather. james? >>james: it does point to be wet, what, what all day. we of rain in san mateo. bring to the north. --rain to the north. it is a substantial bit of grain. a days trekking to the northeast as we said then up to the east we are going to see near the 1 01 at purging whitakeapproaching woodacre. expect, and the next hour or two to see raid.n. just going off shore and trek across the bay is good to be targeted towards a word. expect it to a arrived in just a little bit. this is what we're saying for storm trucker for. --seeing for storm tracker 4. the timing is at 9:00
. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, excuse me. one of those units affected in this crisis. >> i think that's an extremely good news. if a.c. power had been restored within, you know, a day, we wouldn't have had any of the problems we're dealing with right now. it's too bad it's taken six days, going on seven, to get power there. but restoration of a.c. power will make a huge difference, especially at the three nuclear reactors. >> one of your concerns is that we're seeing trouble with three reactors and them having the problem at the same time there.
earthquakes the world has ever seen. 8.9 quake hting japan overnight. the waves now barreling towards the u.s. pictures we are seeing out of japan are unimaginable. it's wave after wave literally swallowing up cars, boats and homes. some terrifying moments in an airport outside of tokyo when the quake hit. watch this video. now there is one report. you find the capital city of tokyo. that report that confirmed. but an earthquake of horrific proportions causing buildings to shake and the tsunami that followed. seldom have we seen images like this. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: this quake struck just after 3:00 p.m. local time in japan while most of us were sleeping. this was the scene. unbelievably powerful waves crashing ashore causing wired spread destruction. there are massive fires being dealt with and a nuclear emergency. we have more details on that. bill: there was so much to watch and do have, we'll do our best it, the 7th largest earthquake ever record. it's the largest to hit japan. evacuations underway in several coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that.
arranged by u.s. embassy left friday morning. there is a bus on its way from sendai to tokyo right now and many will also be taking those charter flights back to the u.s. it's the first wave of american citizens who will be making their way back home out of concern for uncertainty of the nuclear threat on the ground. all of the focus on the nuclear reactor, though, has overshadowed a humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold to the north of us. the death toll now stands at more than 6,000, more than 10,000 still missing. and we're hearing some evacuation centers are still waiting for supplies a week after the earthquake hit. >> and, akiko, one of the factors of this story many people continue to worry about are the workers there around the plant, in the plant. what is the latest on them? >> reporter: well, we are learning more about the operation that's under way. we understand there's about 20 0 to 300 workers involved in this last-ditch effort. they're rotating about 50 workers at a time. we know they're sleeping in a small living room. they are running out of food. we have not le
>>> breaking news -- attack on libya. u.s., french forces, fighting to overthrow moammar gadhafi. president obama insist the attacks only foow gadhafi's refusal to end his assault as the united nation demanded. >> we are answering the call of a threatened people and acting in the interest of the united states and the world. >> we have every reason to fear that, left unchecked, gadhafi will commit unspeakable atrocities. >> this morning, the very latest on the military campaign. its goal and its limits, including the president's order that no u.s. ground troops be committed. with us, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admirabmiral m mullen. >>> then reaction from capitol hill. is libya a threat to the united states? is it too late for military action to make a difference? and should the president have sought congressional authority? with us chairman of the senate armed services committee, carl levin and john kerry of massachusetts and republican member of the armed services committee, senator jeff sessions of alabama. >>> finally, our roundtable assesses the president's leader
of search and rescue teams. so far from australia, new zealand, south korea, and the united states. the u.s. has also sent navy ships to japan to help out with the relief. it's also helping with what president obama calls "lift capacity." heavy lifting equipment. the u.s. also sent supplies to help cool those nuclear reactors there. poland is offering to send firefighters. president medvedev of russia says his country has offered rescuers and sniffer dogs and "all possible aid." thailand is offering about $165,000 in aid. it says it will consider offering more when the extent of the damage is known. and the international red cross say they've mobilized 11 teams to the heavily damaged areas. they have tents and relief supplies ready to pass on to local red cross teams. >>> and the u.s. is sending military ships loaded with supplies and search and rescue teams to help japan, as well. let's get more on the u.s. response. elise, as i understand it, japan is leading the efforts and setting the priorities. is that what you're being told, as well? >> that's right, randi. the japanese government ha
of condolence, is set to address the nation on the crisis that takes a new turn by the hour. >>> today, the u.s. military began drafting plans to evacuate dependents from several bases in the region. the state department says it's now actively assisting other americans wishing to evacuate. among those heeding these warnings are many of our nbc colleagues. but what will they carry with them? at chicago's o'hare and dallas-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest
information here. this is tape up from not too long ago. the u.s. house of representatives has just voted to pass the bill to defund national public radio, npr. the final tally was 228 yeas, 192 nays. so the u.s. house officially has spoken. >>> not too far away from capitol hill it, live pictures at the white house. we're waiting here. any minute the president will be speaking in the rose garden. we're told this was announced just today. he'll be making some sort of brief comment and specifically about japan. we don't know yet fell offer up a little time on the back end to take questions from some of those white house corps reporters. dan lothian is standing by for me as is gloria borger. standing by, as well. dan, let's first set the scene here. i mean, we have just found out today that the president would be speaking. what will do you know about what he may say and also talk about what he's just done this afternoon with regard to the japanese embassy. >> that's right. that's the hint perhaps as to what the president will say when he made that visit unexpected, a stop the an the japanes
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
, about u.s. involvement in the north african country. >> ifill: then, marcia coyle walks us through today's supreme court arguments in a huge class action suit against wal-mart. >> woodruff: we update the nuclear crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron h
an overview perspective on the unrest in the arab world, from former u.s. national security advisors zbigniew brzezinski and brent scowcroft. >> ifill: and judy woodruff gets the latest from japan, where officials now estimate more than 21,000 people are dead or missing, and there's new evidence of radiation in vegetables, milk, and water. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? your financial professional can tell you about pacific life, the power to help you succeed. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, pr
of help the united states is prepared to give. hi, chris. >> yeah, just got off the phone with u.s. forces japan saying they have not yet received a formal request from the japanese government. he also said this is a very different mission than what we're used to. he says think of haiti, things like that where we came in and jumped in and started to help. he said every step of the way has to be mapped out and approved by the japanese government. it's a technologically savvy country with a lot of pride. everything has to be formally requested before the u.s. military can act. let's take a look real quick at the map and i can show you a bit about what the u.s. is dealing with here. you can see the plant, there are helicopter crews running relief missions right around in that area. and for a second day, those u.s. helicopter crews came back with low-level contamination of radiation. they had to be soaped down and all their clothes destroyed. and they came up all clean. they're now being told some of the helicopter crews in and around this area are being told to keep their sleeves rolled down,
prepare suicide the u.s. to deal with the major nuclear emergency. and wave of power -- newly surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits the oregon coastline. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with melting point. a skeleton crew working to prevent an all-out meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant were forced out of the facility for nearly an hour today. the extremely rare measure was called for following a dangerous spike in radiation that japanese authorities feared was a risk to workers' lives. dan shenman reports. >> reporter: authorities in japan have struggled to avert an environmental catastrophe in the plant in tokyo. the rods were being stored in pools of water. seawater has been pumped into reactors one, two, and three to cool fuel rods as they worked to bring down temperatures in reactors five and six. >> if the fuel rod gets exposed, it can become fragile and there's a high chance of a rod to break. radiation material normally contained inside of the cont
. how long will this operation last? how long will the u.s. play a leading role? and will gadhafi himself become a target? our team is on it again tonight. leading it off is martha raddatz. >> u.s. military attack on libya have been intensified in the last 24 hours. targeting not just gadhafi's air defenses but his troops and war planes as well. throughout tonight and into the dawn, u.s. war planes including marine corps jets launched from u.s. jets in the med and air force fighter jets took aim at gadhafi's troopsed a vancing from the southwest to benghazi. >> benghazi is not completely safe from attack. we believe his forces are under significant stress and suffering from both confusion -- >> while they were pounding his forces in the east, three b-2 stealth bombers dropped 45 2,000-pound bombs near the airfield. striking multiple shelters. these are images before the strike and this is the after math. the b-2s which haven't been used in combat for eight years, traveled all of the way from missouri, refueled in the air, dropped their bombs 90,000 pounds of them all. in addition,
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